Patient’s Guide Photoshoot lighting

A couple weeks back I took for pictures of my friend’s New office space. Basically what they wanted was some action shots of everyone working in their new spaces. I’m really just starting to get into the whole lighting thing; I have done some in the past but this was really the first thing on my own with anything more than a reflector. Originally I was going to rent a big monoblock light and softbox to fill in the space but they said they wanted it really low key and really didn’t want me to bring in big lights. Before the monoblock idea I was thinking of using a shop light I had, so that’s what I did. Lately I have been listening to a photo lighting blog and the dyi home depot approach has been coming up a lot, plus, that’s just my style. So I grabbed my clamp light with 60watt warm flourescent bulb, a heavy-duty music stand base I have had forever, my 42″ Calumet reflector (I used the white side), and my Nikon SB600 flash sitting in the hotshoe of my camera. Here are some pics  of the equipment (shot with my point and shoot sans flash or decent lighting), what I like to call my ghetto lighting setup:

Shop light and Music stand

Shop light and Music stand

Light setup and reflector

Light setup and reflector

SB600

SB600

So here was my setup. I had the shop light on the stand raised to head level of the person I was shooting. This was the spotlight or keylight. Because of the warm color bulb I was using it brought… warmth to the person’s face. This light was usually around 4ft (roughly) from the person). On the opposite side of the subject (facing the key light) I placed the white reflector. This brought some fill light in on the other side of their face and knocked down the harsh contrast of light (the reflector probably was about 2ft from the person, right outside the frame). Lastly, I had my flash pointing straight up to softly fill the space with some extra light. I did this because there was a lot of black that was eating up the light (at least that’s what I tell myself). Like I said before, I’m really just starting to get into the whole lighting thing so this could of not been necessary, but it seemed to work. So, here’s a basic diagram of the setup:

lighting setup

lighting setup

Here is one of my favorite shots of the day.

Patients Guide Lighting

Patients Guide Lighting

Not all the shot’s had the same setup, but a lot of them did. Since the shoot I have ordered a couple pieces of lighting equipment, more lighting soon to come. To check out some more of the day’s shots visit my photography blog here.

Any lighting tips are welcomed and appreciated. Thanks.

Interested in know what the Patient’s Guide is all about???? Here you go:
The Patient’s Guide is a leading online resource for the increasingly popular field of aesthetic medicine. With sites like  www.hairremovaljournal.org focusing on all aspects of laser hair removal and  www.stretchmarks.org which provides information about professional removal as well as an ecommerce solution, readers are likely find the solution they’re looking for. Additionally, for people interested in a broader range of skin rejuvenation topics, there are sites like  www.wrinkles.org that offer information about everything from lasers to Thermage to Botox. Check em out at www.patientsguide.com

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One thought on “Patient’s Guide Photoshoot lighting

  1. Pingback: Patient’s Guide Office Shoot « Abrentisart Photography

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