Moleskine art 1

check out some cool art done on moleskines®.via moleskine

Gypsy

Gypsy

Ellos

Ellos

2 Fish

2 Fish

On the Corner

On the Corner

Sludge

Sludge

Self Portrait

Self Portrait

L Eclisse

L' Eclisse

Moth

Moth

more to come soon!

Hedgehog building

This thing looks crazy but it is a pretty cool concept. This has not been built yet but permission has been granted to construct the Hedgehog building. Check out the close up detail of the pines. Think they should name the building Sonic? Read more about it.

hedgehog-building

hedgehog-building

modern tattoo gun

If you know me you know I like tattoo’s, heck I wanted to become a tattoo artist, so I was pretty stoked when this got sent my way. Tattoo machines have a lot of history and character, they are art pieces in themselves in my opinion and reflect the artist. This is a very interesting design, very clean and modern. I wonder if it actually delivers “a less painful tattoo experience and drastically reduced healing times.” Check it out.

Stunning tattoo gun

Stunning tattoo gun

Leça House

This is one super cool modern home. I love the industrial looking exterior especially with the huge 19 (kind of reminds me of a shipping container). The interior has some cool spaces and layout. Check it out

Leca House

Leca House

Viva 2009

Viva Las Vegas 2009 photos are now online. I shot over 400 photos and widdled it down to a handfull to place on flickr. Check em out and comment on your favorite. Abrentisart Flickr photostream. If you are interested in getting a copy of an image or having photos taken feel free to contact me at abrentisart.

Viva 2009

Viva 2009

Viva 2009

Viva 2009

Viva 2009

Viva 2009

Designers are builders too

Designers are builders too. At least I am. It’s in my jeans, or shall I say it runs in the family. Last weekend my dad and myself put in a patio in my backyard, and I must say it didn’t come out that bad. Here are pics. Instructions below if you are interested.

Instructions. These are rough instructions but they might help you get by.

1. Measure the area you wanted to pave. After looking at various paving stones I decided on the generic cement square ones, they were the cheapest and working with a square is easier than other weird shapes.

2. Dig out the area to be a couple inches deep.

3. Make a basic frame out of treated 2×4’s. Use treated wood because it withstands the elements. Add a 1/4″ to 1/2″ to your dimensions to account for “wiggle room” of the pavers. When Making the frame make sure the corners are square by using a square. Put a level on the stud one side to see if it’s level. Raise it til it is, hammer a wooden stake into the ground (we used 2 per side) and drill stud into stake so it stays at the perfect height. Repeat with other sides.

4. Add dirt and make level with a tamper. Add gravel (cover area) and tamper. Add sand and level with tamper. The amount of each is dependent upon how high you want your patio. Measure the height of your paver stone, then add an inch for sand and another inch for gravel that’s how far you need to dig down.

5. Add paver stones. I found that leaving a small gap (1/8″ – 1/4″) between each stone makes it easier to keep square (though the pavers are square they are not all perfect), if you do this account for it when making your frame. Place stones down. Use your level across 2+ stones to make sure you remain level. Add or subtract sand under each stone to make perfect.

6. Fill all cracks and gaps with sand. Brush away all excess sand and water lightly, this will compact your gravel/sand foundation.

Enjoy your new DIY patio.